Posted on

Teaching pre-literacy in the classroom

 By-Michelle Newell

Reading is so important for young learners, and here are some reasons why. It helps learners get to know sounds, words and language, as well as develop early literacy skills. Reading also sparks learner’s imagination, helps stimulate curiosity and expands their understanding of the world.  

Therefore, it is important that we as teachers, provide students with the necessary skills to become confident and avid readers. This entails that they have a strong pre-literacy foundation. There are 5 critical pre-literacy skills that we should focus on; print awareness, letter knowledge, phonological awareness, listening comprehension, and motivation to read. Here are some tips to help develop pre-literacy skills in the classroom. 

Print awareness – teach your students where the front and back of the book are, how to turn pages, and that we read from left to right.  

Letter knowledge – teach your students to be able to name upper– and lower-case letters and identify the corresponding printed symbol, as well as being able to produce the phonics sounds of each of the letters.  

Phonological awareness – teach your students to blend sounds into words, strong phonological awareness means students will be able to read more easily. Play games that encourage students to identify particular letter sounds within a word.  

Listening comprehension – during reading lessons encourage students to interact with the stories. Pre-teach vocabulary and use TPR, this will help students to better understand the reader. Get students to do a role-play/act-out the reader, this will help them develop the skills to be able to retell it.   

Motivation to read – make reading time fun and enjoyable in your class.; create games that can be used during reading lessons that encourage students to interact with the readers.  

What are you doing to improve pre-literacy in the classroom?  

“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you’ll go.”— Dr. Seuss 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *